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Environmental Protection & Preservation


Motorola Calls Schools to Join Race to Recycle Program


Motorola, Inc today renewed its call for US schools to earn extra money and help the environment by collecting used mobile phones for reuse and recycling through the company's Race to Recycle program.

Race to Recycle enables accredited K-12 schools to earn extra cash for books, desks, computers, gym equipment, extracurricular activities and more while doing their part to protect the environment. Students, parents and entire communities work together to get old mobile phones out of closets and drawers and into the recycling bin. Each school can earn up to $21,000 per calendar year. Schools in each U.S. state currently participate.

Motorola operates multiple U.S. recycling programs. This includes collections taken by participating schools, postage-paid envelopes packaged with new Motorola phones for mail back and joint programs with mobile carriers. Postage-paid labels also are available at http://www.motorola.com/racetorecycle. Motorola accepts any manufacturer's mobile phone for reuse and recycling. A portion of the proceeds collected through all of these programs helps reward schools participating in Race to Recycle.

"The Race to Recycle program goes beyond philanthropy to unite our commitment to environmental goals, community outreach and education," said Jodi Shapiro, vice president of Motorola environment, health and safety. "The success of our reuse and recycling program depends on consumers handing back their used mobile phones. The schools help us with this in an easy, environmentally friendly, educational way for schools to raise funds."

In Dalzell, S.C., Thomas Sumter Academy has earned more than $8,000 through Race to Recycle. In this small town, local businesses and town citizens bring used phones to high school football and basketball games -- even earning free admission with a used-phone donation.

"Everyone realizes the program is good for both the school and the environment," says Carolyn Shipman, who organizes the effort for the private school's Athletic Booster Club. "We've used the money earned to build up the school's baseball program with a new baseball pitching machine, batting cage and field seeding/fertilizing. Plus, we have purchased new exercise equipment and new basketball team warm-up suits."





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