Green Progress
 

Environmental Protection & Preservation


Carnegie Mellon's Granger Morgan Pens Op-Ed Demanding Curbs On CO2 Emissions


In today's Science magazine, Morgan argues that legislators should impose regulations that will prevent power companies from rushing to build large numbers of long-lived conventional coal plants before regulations on carbon dioxide emissions come into effect. Building such plants today, without making provisions for future control of carbon dioxide emissions, could make such future regulations far more expensive than they need to be, according to Morgan, head of Carnegie Mellon's Department of Engineering and Public Policy.

The U.S. electricity industry plans to build 154 new plants in the next 24 years. Fifty of those plants are slated for construction in the next five years, according to data compiled by the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory.

"We're talking about technology such as amine scrubbers, integrated gasification combined- cycles or oxyfuel plants that can capture and sequester CO2 in deep geological formations," Morgan said.

Morgan said that most utility experts anticipate that CO2 emission constraints will be imposed within the next 10 years. "So imposing a law that would provide incentives to encourage builders of new coal plants could begin to help us intensify efforts to combat global warming," he said.

In a recent report to the Pew Center For Climate Change, Morgan and Carnegie Mellon colleagues Jay Apt and Lester Lave showed that the nation needs to cut carbon dioxide emissions from electricity generation by more than 80 percent during the next 50 years to slow the impact of global warming.

"This could be done at an overall long-term cost increase in price of electricity of only about 20 percent, a small price to pay to save arctic seals, polar bears, coral reefs and other valuable ecosystems," Morgan said.





More Environmental Protection & Preservation Articles


Global Thermostat Named Among World’s 10 Most Innovative Energy Companies


Coal-fired power generation coming to an end in New Zealand


Researchers Find Less Expensive Way to Convert Carbon Dioxide


New Technology to Recycle All Type of Plastics Without Using Water


Recycling Styrofoam into rigid plastic


Veolia transforms non-recyclable paper into new products


SaskPower launches world's first commercial carbon capture and storage process


Carbon Taxes and Emissions Trading are Cheapest Ways of Reducing CO2, According to OECD


Artificial Lung to Remove Carbon Dioxide - from Smokestacks


Pilot Plant to Permanently Store CO2 Emissions as Carbonate Rock Bricks for use in Construction Industry

even more articles...

Suggest an Article for Green Progress









Green Progress :: Green Technology and Environmental Science News
Green Progress is an EcoMethods™ sustainability project. Copyright © 2005 - 2018 Green Progress. All rights reserved.